Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Maximizing Communication Between Clients and Attorneys

This research guide brings together the knowledge and experiences of attorneys, law professors and, law students to consider the effective representation of diverse groups and individuals in urban communities.

Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Law: Introduction

Note: This research guide was created by CWRU Law reference librarian Cheryl Cheatham. The expectedfinal update is Oct. 2, 2020. You may udate the guide by searching for books and articles using the subject headings and keywords suggested in the "Search Terms and Websites" tab.

This research guide brings together the knowledge and experiences of attorneys, law professors and, law students to consider the effective representation of diverse groups and individuals in urban communities.

Background Information

Case Western Reserve University has been committed to experiential education since the establishment of its clinical program over 45 years ago.  The development of our curriculum is premised on the value of "real" lawyering experiences throughout the three years of law school as necessary preparation for practice and as a means for learning substantive law.

The Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center currently gives 80 students a year the opportunity to engage in practice under faculty supervision.  Eight full-time faculty teach in civil litigation, criminal justice, community development, health, and intellectual property clinics with clients who could not otherwise afford access to representation.

For more information about the Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center, see https://law.case.edu/Academics/Experiential-Education